If you’ve ever read an article about New York City in the 1920s or 30s, chances are high you’ve seen his photographs. PL Sperr’s images explore every neighborhood, every bridge and highway and most of the corners of the city,—and yet he remains relatively unknown. There isn’t even a Wikipedia page about him and there is only one article that has been written about him specifically. New York Times mentions him only once for an article about a new mobile app:

“His New York is a city of horse-drawn milk wagons and brooding mansions, snack bar shacks and clamorous shipping docks, fleeting men in straw hats, strangely empty streets and demolition sites destined for skyscrapers like the Woolworth Building.”

PL Sperr Photo

6th Avenue at Houston Street and , to Northwest, Manhattan

Born in December 28, 1889, Percy Loomis Sperr was unable to walk for most of his life because of meningitis, and he had to use crutches to get around. After his son was born in 1920, Sperr moved with his family to New York (Staten Island, to be precise, that he called “the Cinderella of boroughs”) from Ohio. He was hoping to become a writer, and started taking photographs to use them as illustrations for his stories. Sperr took tens of thousands of photos from the late 1920s to the early 1940s.




But Sperr was more successful as a photographer than he was as a writer. Publications asked for his pictures and not stories. He was often invited to many city events of the time as a photographer and gained the honorary title of Official Photographer for the City of New York. But it appears that he was not entirely content with only being known as a photographer. He wrote in 1934, “I am not much of a camera fan. My own interest is rather in the story than in the picture.”

Despite that, Sperr kept taking photographs and documented such decisive city developments as the construction of Lincoln Square, Penn Station, Penny Bridge and the subway system.

PL Sperr Photo

Bridges – Manhattan Bridge – [Plaza and approach on the Brooklyn side.]

It seems that we will not see his exhibition in a museum, or it might take a while until we do, unlike, for instance, Berenice Abbott, whose celebrity only grows. But PL Sperr documented an important part of NYC’s growth and has become one with the city’s history.

Some of PL Sperr’s photos (about 18 thousand) are available on NYPLs web archive. A small portion of them was also used for a website and app OldNYC, which collects old photos of New York City and puts them on an easy to use map.

Ivan Kosnyrev, a contemporary photographer based in NYC, had juxtaposed PL Sperr’s photographs to his own, made of same places but in 2017. Below are the results. Please enjoy:

PL Sperr photo

Church Street, east side, south from Sixth Ave (March 19, 1932 // June 3, 2017)


PL Sperr photo

Hudson Street, west side, north from Harrison, including Franklin Street (March 27, 1929 // July 3, 2017)


PL Sperr Photo

Chambers Street, north side, facing east towards and including Broadway and Centre Street (November 6, 1936 // July 4, 2017)


PL Sperr Photo

West Broadway, east side, north of White Street (July 12, 1939 // July 3, 2017)


PL Sperr Photo

107–101 Chambers Street, the NW corner of Church St. (April 3, 1931 // July 4, 2017)


PL Sperr Photo

Hubert Street, north side, east of Collister to Hudson streets (August 2, 1937 // July 3, 2017)


PL Sperr Photo

NE corner of the intersection of Washington St. and Watts St. (August 3, 1937 // June 29 2017)


PL Sperr

Laight Street, north side, west of Greenwich Street (May 3, 1941 // June 29 2017)


PL Sperr Photo

Sixth Ave, as viewed to the north from Franklin Street (September 12, 1927 // July 17, 2017)

This 1946 Map Shows How Native American Trails Became the Streets of Brooklyn
New York Trib
Brooklyn Heights Blog shares some insight into Brooklyn’s familiar roads that began as Native American trails on a 1946 map titled “Indian Villages, Paths, Ponds and Places in Kings County.”
When Greenpoint Was the Second Largest Industrial Center in the US
New York Trib
100 years ago, it was estimated that 200,000,000 feet of lumber per year were sold to, or consumed by all of the neighborhood’s various industries.
Did You Know That Scrabble Was Invented in Jackson Heights, Queens
New York Trib
Legend has it that the inventor chose the frequency and distribution of game tiles by counting letters on the pages of the New York Times, the New York Herald Tribune
The Long-Forgotten History of Leif Ericson Park in Bay Ridge
New York Trib
Leif Ericson is one long chain of parks, it exists as a series of small parks that, by nature of their history, happen to be contiguous.
Two Streets Renamed for the ‘Bishop of the Bronx’
New York Trib
Simpson was coined the ‘Bishop of the Bronx’ for helping to pave the way for African-Americans to serve in Southern Baptist life.
De Blasio Administration Unveils Plans for 4 Jails to Replace Facilities on Rikers Island
New York Trib
Post Views: 634
Deadly Legionnaires’ Outbreak Traced to Harlem High-Rise: City
New York Trib
A Legionnaires' Disease outbreak that sickened dozens of people in Harlem and Washington Heights, killing one, is under control and officials have identified its source, the city Health Department announced
Some Subway Platforms Are Literally 100 Degrees Hot
New York Trib
On Thursday, August 9, 2018, the Regional Plan Association (RPA) sent out an intrepid task force of staff and interns to measure the temperature in the city’s ten busiest subway
A Shoe-Sized Oyster Found in the Hudson River
New York Trib
It is not uncommon to find wild oysters in the river, but it is rare to find one that has survived long enough, an estimated ten to fifteen years, to
Cuomo Announces DMV Using New Technology to Crack Down on Underage Drinking
New York Trib
The new pilot program is supported by new technology developed by New York-based company. New York is the first state in the nation to pilot the program.